Feltham fire: 100 firefighters tackling huge grass fire covering Heathrow Airport with smoke

The London Fire Brigade has asked residents in the area - particularly around Bedfont Sports Club - to keep their windows and doors closed.

Around 100 firefighters are tackling a huge grass fire next to Heathrow Airport, with the smoke billowing into the sky.

The London Fire Brigade has asked residents in the area - particularly around Bedfont Sports Club - to keep their windows and doors closed.

Crews from fifteen fire engines are tackling the grass fire in Hatton Road, Feltham.

The street runs parallel to Heathrow Airport, and smoke can be easily seen from the transport hub.

A view of the fire and smoke from Heathrow Airport. Credit: Barry

The London Fire Brigade has said around six hectares of land is alight, including standing crop, a field, parkland, grassland, a cemetery and an animal sanctuary.

Station Commander Paul Casey, who is at the scene, said: “The fire is producing a large amount of smoke.

“Residents in the local area, particularly around Bedfont Sports Club, should keep their windows and doors closed.”

Heathrow Airport has a fire right next to it. Credit: Barry

The brigade was called at 2.53pm, with crews from Feltham, Chiswick, Heathrow, Heston and surrounding fire stations scrambled to the scene.

The cause of the fire is not known at this time.

The London Fire Brigade has called for a total ban on disposable barbecues after a raft of fires across the capital.

It said in the week starting July 18, firefighters attended more than 1,000 blazes with 8,302 calls, with 34 grass fires requiring more than four fire engines.

Commissioner Andy Roe said: “Despite our grass fire warnings, we’ve still seen some people behaving carelessly and recklessly.

“We need urgent action now to see a national ban on the sale of disposable barbecues.

“They can be bought for as little as five pounds and can cause untold damage, especially when the grass is as dry as it has been over the last few weeks.

“Last week is another example of how we are increasingly being challenged by new extremes of weather as our climate changes and we’re developing long-term strategies to deal with more incidents like this in the future.”