Satanist killer Danyal Hussein jailed for 35 years for murdering Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman

The 19-year-old promised the sacrifice of six women in six months to scoop the Mega Millions Super Jackpot and made Bibaa Henry, 46, and Nicole Smallman, 27, his first victims.

The “Lottery Killer” who murdered the daughters of a pioneering cleric in a demonic pact to win a multi million pound jackpot has been jailed for at least 35 years.

Danyal Hussein, 19, promised the sacrifice of six women in six months to scoop the Mega Millions Super Jackpot and made Bibaa Henry, 46, and Nicole Smallman, 27, his first victims.

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The sisters were enjoying a lockdown party to celebrate Ms Henry’s birthday in Fryent Country Park, Wembley, on June 6 last year as Hussein watched them from the undergrowth.

After the other guests had drifted away in the early hours he sprang from the darkness with a carving knife to kill first Ms Henry and then her sister in a so-called “celebration of death”.

Ms Henry was taken by surprise and had no chance to defend herself.

When her younger sister put up a desperate struggle Hussein took revenge in a “frenzied” attack, stabbing her 29 times.

Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman. Credit: Met Police

He dragged both bodies into the undergrowth and cleared away the picnic blankets and cushions in an attempt to cover up what he had done.

But he had been badly cut in the attack and dripped blood on to the bodies of both women and their belongings.

Scotland Yard believes Hussein, of Guy Barnett Grove, Kidbrooke, Greenwich, would have gone on to kill more women if he had not injured his hand.

Concerned friends had raised the alarm when Ms Henry, a social worker, and Ms Smallman, a bar worker, did not answer their phones on the morning after the party.

They were angry when police did not begin looking for the women and launched their own search of the park.

Within minutes they found the women’s sunglasses and the murder weapon in the grass.

Adam Stone, Ms Smallman’s partner, then fell to his knees screaming when he discovered the two entwined bodies of the women in the undergrowth.

CCTV footage showed Hussein leaving the park and arriving back at his father’s home nearby.

In his bedroom, police found the contract he had written out for the demon, signed in his own blood, complete with three lottery tickets.

It read: “Agreement for the lucifuge rofocale.

“Perform a minimum of six sacrifices every six months for as long as I am free and physically capable.

Danyal Hussein’s blood signature for his so-called pact with Lucifer. Credit: Met Police

“Sacrifice only women, build a temple for you do everything that I have promised for me win the Mega Millions Super Jackpot to...receive fruitful rewards.

“In return for the future sacrifices I make to you, the rewards could consist of wealth and power.”

He had signed the single word “Danyal” in his own blood.

The killer lived with his mother in Kidbrooke, but also visited his father who lived in Old Kenton Lane, Wembley, near the park.

Hussein was obsessed with the idea of becoming a multi-millionaire and believed the only way to do it was to strike a pact with a demon by becoming a serial killer.

The sisters’ mother, Mina Smallman, was the Church of England’s first female archdeacon from a black or minority ethnic background.

She was outraged by the slow response to the murder and has said she is “convinced” her daughters’ race played a role in the slow investigation into their deaths.

Hussein denied but was convicted of two charges of murder and possessing an offensive weapon by an Old Bailey jury in July after a month-long trial.

Riel Karmy-Jones, QC, defending, told the court that Hussein had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and the psychiatric points to the possibility of the other mental health issues “running in tandem” with it.

Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman

“We hope that with some time and perhaps some treatment that the victims’ family, the family of these two women who were tragically lost, they may get some answers as to his motivation,” she added.

Hussein, who appeared in court via videolink from a suite in maximum-security Belmarsh prison, squatted on a chair and seemed to disengaged during the hearing.

The unshaven double killer, who now has long curly hair, was wearing grey tracksuit bottoms and a grey Puma sweatshirt.

He was convicted of two counts of murder and possession of an offensive weapon, following a jury trial in July.

Lady Justice Philippa Whipple sentenced Hussein to a minimum of 35 years imprisonment at the Old Bailey today.

She told Hussein: “The lives of these family members have been shattered.

“Mina talks of this ‘nightmare’, of the impact on every day since then, of the horror of knowing the details of how they died, of having to put grief on hold because of this trial, and of being haunted by the knowledge of her children’s suffering: ‘I think that will disturb me for the rest of my life.’

“To lose two treasured family members and friends in this way is unimaginable.

“But you made that loss worse by your refusal to acknowledge your actions.

“You made those family members and friends sit through day after day of evidence at this trial - you admitted nothing.

“So the court was subjected to lengthy evidence about your careful planning, about the extensive wounds inflicted by you causing death, about your efforts to hide the bodies and cover your actions, and about your apparent nonchalance after the murders.”

The judge, who had ordered a psychiatric report prior to sentence, said that the killer’s culpability was not reduced by any mental illness.

“There was no medical evidence put before the court to explain your actions at trial,” she said.

“That was at your own insistence because your defence was that you were not there.

“That precluded any possibility of a psychiatric defence, which would have to be based on an acceptance that it was you who killed these women,” she added.

Mrs Justice Whipple thanked the sisters’ family for the “quiet dignity” they had shown throughout the trial, adding “no family should have to endure this”.