London train strikes: What services are affected this weekend?

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Members of ASLEF and the RMT will begin their strike action this weekend over pay.

A series of rail strikes are set to begin this weekend after rail unions rejected the most recent pay deal offered by the Rail Delivery Group (RDG).

Drivers union ASLEF and RMT transport workers union will be leading the walkouts which will take place throughout May and June.

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This weekend the disruptions will coincide with the Eurovision Song Contest on Saturday May 13, which is being hosted in Liverpool.

Several train companies in and around London will be impacted.

What dates are the London strikes taking place?

ASLEF members from 15 train companies will walk out on Friday May 12, Wednesday May 31, and Saturday June 3 2023.

The RMT strikes will affect staff at 14 train companies on Saturday, May 13.

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An overtime ban for ASLEF members is also being implemented from Monday May 15 to Saturday May 20 inclusive, and on Saturday May 13 and Thursday June 1.

Train strikes this weekend could affect Londoners travelling to the Eurovision song contestTrain strikes this weekend could affect Londoners travelling to the Eurovision song contest
Train strikes this weekend could affect Londoners travelling to the Eurovision song contest | AFP via Getty Images

Which London train lines will be affected?

The rail operators impacted by the strikes are Avanti West Coast; c2c (May 13 only); Chiltern Railways; CrossCountry; East Midlands Railway; Gatwick Express; Great Northern; Great Western Railway; Greater Anglia / Stansted Express; Heathrow Express (May 12, 31 and June 3); LNER; London Northwestern Railway; Northern; Southeastern; Southern; South Western Railway; Thameslink; TransPennine Express; West Midlands Railway.

Passengers are advised to check National Rail’s website closer to the date before travelling.

Regular services will all be running on the underground, overground, and Elizabeth lines, but they are expected to be busier than usual.

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Will there be Tube strikes?

TSSA union members working on the Elizabeth line will strike on Wednesday May 24, coinciding with the first anniversary of the new line.

The RMT Union is re-balloting its members for strike action on the London Underground, and its current mandate to undertake strike action ends in June.

Why are UK train workers striking?

The RMT and ASLEF are fighting for a pay rise and improved working conditions. ASLEF recently rejected a 4% pay offer describing it as “risible.”

Both unions also do not accept the government’s plans for ‘modernisation’ of the railway attached to the offers, such as exploring proposals to remove ticket offices.

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Mick Lynch, general secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT)Mick Lynch, general secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT)
Mick Lynch, general secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT)

What is the RMT saying?

RMT leader Mick Lynch said: “The RDG have reneged on their original proposals and torpedoed these negotiations. No doubt their decision is due to pressure exerted on them by the Tory government.”

“Therefore, we have no alternative but to press ahead with more strike action and continue our campaign for a negotiated settlement on pay, conditions and job security.”

What is ASLEF saying?

Mick Whelan, ASLEF’s general secretary, said: “We do not want to go on strike — we do not want to inconvenience passengers, we have families and friends who use the railway, too, and we believe in investing in rail for the future of this country.

“But the blame for this action lies, fairly and squarely, at the feet of the employers who have forced our hand over this by their intransigence.

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“It is now up to them to come up with a more sensible, and realistic, offer and we ask the government not to hinder this process.”

What is the Rail Delivery Group saying?

A Rail Delivery Group (RDG) spokesperson said: “We urge the ASLEF leadership to rejoin us at the negotiating table and work with us to find a solution to the issues our industry faces and so we can give our people the pay rise we have always said we wanted to do.”

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