TfL: Reimagined London Tube map launched with key changes made to each station

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The TfL Tube map sees Tube stations replaced with the names of engineers such as Dr Gladys West and Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

London is paying homage to the world’s greatest engineers as an alternative version of its Tube map is launched this National Engineering Day.

Transport for London (TfL), the Royal Academy of Engineering and the London Transport Museum have joined forces to produce the reimagined map, with all 274 Tube and Elizabeth line stops instead named after a combination of historic and current engineers.

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The launch coincides with this year’s National Engineering Day (November 1), held annually on the first Wednesday in November.

Professionals from fields ranging from transport to health have been chosen to mark the occasion, with some notable names including Oxford Circus becoming Harry Beck, the creator of the original Underground map, Uxbridge named after Dr Gladys West, famous for her work which fed into the Global Positioning System, and Ealing Common renamed after Isambard Kingdom Brunel, arguably the most celebrated civil engineer of the 19th century.

Each line is linked to a particular area of work, such as sports, media and culture along the Bakerloo line and life and health along Central. Several additional icons have also been included, indicating whether the engineer received a Nobel Prize or Queen Elizabeth Prize, a UK National Honour, or was a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering.

The reimagined Tube map has been launched to honour some of the world's most famous engineers. Credit: TfL.The reimagined Tube map has been launched to honour some of the world's most famous engineers. Credit: TfL.
The reimagined Tube map has been launched to honour some of the world's most famous engineers. Credit: TfL. | TfL

Deputy mayor for Transport Seb Dance said: “Engineers played a crucial role in recent major transport projects like the Elizabeth line and the Northern Line extension, and throughout history have helped shape the capital into the world-leading city it is today.

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“I’m delighted TfL has joined forces with the Royal Academy of Engineering to launch this new Tube map celebrating the achievements and contributions of engineers, some well-known and others we should know more about.

“I hope this initiative inspires Londoners from all walks of life to consider engineering as a career, helping us to continue building a better, more prosperous London for everyone.”

The map has been released on National Engineering Day, marked on the first Wednesday in November each year. Credit: TfL.The map has been released on National Engineering Day, marked on the first Wednesday in November each year. Credit: TfL.
The map has been released on National Engineering Day, marked on the first Wednesday in November each year. Credit: TfL. | TfL

Andy Lord, London’s transport commissioner who is an engineer himself, said: “From the pioneering days of the first steam train to the cutting-edge technology of the new Elizabeth line in London, engineering has played a vital role in shaping transport in London and across the country.

“With the re-design of the map, which was an idea inspired by our former head of engineering, Kuldeep Gharatya who shares my passion for improving diversity and inclusion across the industry, we hope that we can encourage people from all backgrounds to consider engineering as a rewarding career. Together, we can pave the way for the UK to lead in engineering.”

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Dr Hayaatun Sillem CBE, chief executive of the Royal Academy of Engineering, said: “So much of London and the daily lives of Londoners has been designed, created and improved by engineers, and today it remains a hub of engineering innovation, from next generation transport to the development of AI tools to improve cancer diagnosis.

“So I’m delighted that, to mark National Engineering Day, TfL has worked with the Academy to create this map that recognises the achievements of both established and up and coming engineers who have shaped our lives. The work of engineers often goes unrecognised, which means many of us have a limited idea of what engineering really is. 

“Today is a day to change that and uncover the stories of ingenuity, teamwork and persistence that have made their mark on the city around us.”

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