7/7 anniversary: London commemorates 52 bombing victims 17 years on

The terrorist bombing of three Underground stations and a double-decker bus constituted the worst attack on the capital since the Second World War.

Today marks 17 since years since the deadliest act of terrorism the UK has ever seen.

On July 7 2005, four suicide bombers with rucksacks full of explosives attacked central London, killing 52 people and injuring hundreds more.

July 7 2005 saw the deadliest act of terrorism the UK has ever seen.

The terrorist bombing of three Underground stations and a double-decker bus constituted the worst attack on the capital since the Second World War, and remains the worst individual terrorist attrocity on British soil.

The mayor of London, Sadiq Khan says the city is in debt to the emergency services who came to London’s aid that day.

The three Tube bombs went off almost simultaneously during the weekday morning rush hour, close to three stations.

One was detonated just outside Liverpool Street station, the other outside Edgware Road and the third between Kings Cross and Russell Square.

The London Underground bombs killed 39 people.

One of the bombs was detonated just outside Edgware Station

The fourth device was detonated just under an hour later at Tavistock Square, on the upper deck of the red London bus. Another 13 were died from this blast.

The bombers were later confirmed to be 30-year old Mohammad Sidique Khan, 24-year old Shehzad Tanweer and 19-year old Germaine Lindsay.

Hasib Hussain the bus bomber was only 18 years old.

It was revealed later that Sidique Khan, Tanweer and Hussain had travelled from Leeds early that morning, joining Lindsay at Luton, north of London.

A subsequent investigation found that two of the young men had been under surveillance and had possible links to Al Qaeda, but the extent of the terrorist group's involvement is not known.

The four used easily available materials to make their bombs.

Sadiq Khan pays tribute to the victims of July 7 at the Hyde Park memorial

The mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: “Today is a day for remembrance as we honour the 52 people whose lives were taken and the more than 700 who were injured by the abhorrent terrorist attacks on our city on July 7 2005.

“It’s important to also pay tribute to the heroes who came to London’s aid that day.

“From emergency service workers and staff on our transport network, to the extraordinary members of the public who ran towards danger without hesitation to save lives and help those in need.

“Our city is in their debt.

“London will always stand united against the evils of hatred and terrorism and our values of freedom and mutual respect will always prevail over those who seek to divide us.”

7/7 Memorial in Hyde Park

In 2009 a permanent July 7 memorial was erected in Hyde Park.

Fifty-two stainless steel pillars stand together in four clusters in the south-eastern corner of the 350-acre site.

Each of the pillars represents one person who died, while each cluster symbolises one of the four locations where the bombs went off.